Strokkur

After starting with fair isle hats, the next progression in my colourwork knitting was a yoked jumper. The classic style of a colourwork yoke knit in the round above a plain knit body seems to have been around forever, but it is in fact a fairly recent invention – Bohus-style jumpers appeared in Sweden c. 1940, followed by Icelandic lopi yokes (or lopapeysa) in the 1950s.* They really took off in the 60s and 70s, then as now contributing to Iceland’s national identity and tourist trade.

Icelandic girls wearing traditionally patterned lopapeysa sweaters
Icelandic girls wearing traditionally patterned lopapeysa sweaters. Source: Wikimedia Commons

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Burda long sleeved blouse 04/2010 #114, V2

If you’re a regular reader of my blog, you’ll know my love for Burda and their shirt patterns in particular. A couple of years back, I made the Burda 04/2010 #114 long-sleeved blouse which became my most-loved and worn button up shirt. When it finally hit the dust (RIP shirt), I didn’t think twice before replacing it.

A woman stands in front of blue weatherboard. She wears a white button up shirt and blue jeans.

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Two more Hemlock Tees

Warning: contains GIFs

I went on a knit-sewing session a while back, resulting in my ponte skirt and a couple of long-sleeve tees. I actually meant to blog them together, but the weather has been so offensively hot this Autumn that I’ve had to wait until it cooled down enough that I could wear long sleeves without swooning like a 20s film star.

Woman faints backwards.
Or Alba. I’m kinda obsessed with Jane the Virgin right now.

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Maria Denmark knit ponte skirt (self-drafted)

Even though I’ve been trying to keep up with my blog posts, I haven’t really been sewing as much lately as is usual for me. Sitting at the machine requires a lot more effort than I can muster most days, so my output has slowed considerably. This has led to a rethink of my sewing strategy: I can’t buy a lot of fabric with the guarantee that I will burn through it quickly, so I’ve been taking stock of what I already have and working out what to do with it.

A woman stands in front of a blue brick wall. She wears a white peplum top, navy white stripe knit pencil skirt, and animal print tights and clogs.
Leopard print matches leopard print, right? That’s my In the Folds Peplum Top, BTW.

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Style Arc Blaire Shirt

You know when a project looks really different in your head to the final outcome? That’s what happened with my Style Arc Blaire Shirt. I completely misinterpreted the pattern of the fabric and the cut of the shirt, and ended up with an oversized, tropical-style shirt, entirely by accident. And I love it!

A woman stands in front of hibiscus plant. She wears a green, tropical print shirt, skinny jeans and silver runners.

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A retro playsuit – Butterick 6354

I’m back, with what might be my most spectacular creation so far! It’s a retro-style playsuit for my friend/pin-up, Becca BamBam. Her pinup character is so fabulous I felt it fitting to create something equally fabulous to suit.

Woman poses in front of a pink vintage car. She wears a retro playsuit, consisting of a bustier top and sarong skirt in a blue tropical print. She holds a parasol.

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An easier way to cast on

Do you ever find yourself getting confused when you’re trying to cast on a large number of stitches? I inevitably lose count when I’m casting on for a cardi body or hat brim, and only realise my mistake when the ribbing ends with the wrong stitch!

This is a quick tip for making sure you cast on exactly the number of stitches you intend to. There’s not much to it: just cast on 20 sts (or your multiple of choice), add a stitch marker, and start casting on your lot of 20 again. It is so much easier to keep track of 7 lots of 20 than 140 sts, and doing a quick check is easier too when you’re working in small sections at a time. Continue reading “An easier way to cast on”