Ottobre retro-style “modern classic pants”

A while back, I mentioned the secondhand fabric collection that my friend Lauren had kindly sent me. After sewing a Burda Tie Front Blouse from the Swiss voile, I was eager to move onto this beautiful retro print fabric. And what better match for a brown bold floral than wide leg pants?

Siobhan stands in front of a garden fence. She wears a brown turtleneck long sleeve top, brown with orange and pink floral print wide leg high waisted pants, brown block heel boots, and tortoiseshell glasses. She is accompanied by a black and white cat, and is smiling.
Say hi to Patrick! Wearing my Named Paola Turtleneck Tee.

My small stack of Ottobre magazines provided a pattern: #15. Modern classics – high rise pants, from their latest Spring/Summer 2/2019 Woman magazine. It was a current pattern at the time – I sewed these in March and have only photographed and blogged them now!

As I only had 2m of this narrow fabric, squeezing a pair of wide leg pants out was quite the challenge. I managed it with some judicious cutting, piecing the waistband facing and taking 7cm length (!) from the pant hem.

This included the hem allowance, and I managed to eke out hem facings by cutting a scrap against the grain. But still, when I tried these on sans facings, they were near the perfect length (if not slightly too long). I clearly have the legs of a short person on the body of a tall person!

Siobhan stands in front of a garden fence. She wears a brown turtleneck long sleeve top, brown with orange and pink floral print wide leg high waisted pants, brown block heel boots, and tortoiseshell glasses. She is accompanied by a black and white cat, and is smiling.

Oh, and I also took 1.5cm from the rise, altering the pocket, pocket facing and waistband to fit. This was to help the pattern fit on the fabric, but also because I don’t like a true high waist pant. These sit just above my belly button, which is fine by me.

 

I was really happy with how well these fit out of the packet (magazine?). One of the reasons I incline towards Ottobre and Burda patterns is because I know they will fit, and these certainly did with the bare minimum of alterations.

Siobhan stands in front of a garden fence. She wears a brown turtleneck long sleeve top, brown with orange and pink floral print wide leg high waisted pants, brown block heel boots, and tortoiseshell glasses. She is accompanied by a black and white cat, and has turned to the side to show the fit of the pants.

There are one or two issues: the front pulls a little, causing the pockets to gape. I probably should have drafted a pocket stay for the area, but I get a bit funny about design features which promise to “control” a body part. And the other is on me – the instructions clearly indicate to interface both sides of the waistband, which I totally overlooked. As a result, the waistband is quite soft and stretchy, and I fear it may stretch out of shape over time.

A close up of the waist area of brown pants with a pink and orange floral print. It is a good fit though the zip gapes/buckles slightly.

 

I’m not quite sure what the fabric is, but it feels absolutely lovely to touch. It’s a non-stretch woven (with quite a bit of give), plain backed with a very slight pile on the right side, possibly velour. Whatever it is, it proved very easy to sew as the pile just stuck together – no slipping or sliding around like some fabrics (I’m looking at you, poly satin).

Siobhan stands in front of a garden fence. She wears a brown turtleneck long sleeve top, brown with orange and pink floral print wide leg high waisted pants, brown block heel boots, and tortoiseshell glasses. She is accompanied by a black and white cat, and has her back facing the camera to show the fit of the pants..

As is usual with Ottobre patterns, the instructions are brief but clear. They direct you to the Ottobre website for the zip instructions, which were far less clear! The main difference with Ottobre’s technique is you sew the zip to the fly shield first, then the fly shield-zip combo to the zip insertion area on the pant, before flipping and topstitching the underlap.

This proved a lot easier than my usual method (turn the underlap and sew directly to the zip, with the fly shield attached later), and I’ll be sure to use it in my future fly front zips. You would need some experience with sewing fly front zips to parse Ottobre’s instructions, but I’d recommend the method for an easier and cleaner insertion.

A fly front in a trouser sewn up in 70s style brown floral textured fabric. The waist is unfinished.
Some in progress pics. Love a good fly front zip.

A fly front in a trouser sewn up in 70s style brown floral textured fabric. The zip is open and the waist is unfinished.

The inside of a fly front in a trouser sewn up in 70s style brown floral textured fabric. The waist is unfinished.
I think the fly shield needs to be slightly wider, don’t you?

 

As for the pattern, it’s a total win. If you’re looking for a more classic-style, high rise, slightly wide leg pant, this is for you. Due to issues with pain, I’m not really wearing high rise or non-stretch pants anymore, so these are on that ever-growing pile of “things I’d like to wear one day when I feel a bit better” (along with, among other things, my beautiful Lotta Stockholm clogs). These were sewn months ago and have sat there since. Fellow spoonies, tell me you have one of these piles and I’m not alone!

Siobhan stands in front of a garden fence. She wears a brown turtleneck long sleeve top, brown with orange and pink floral print wide leg high waisted pants, brown block heel boots, and tortoiseshell glasses. She is accompanied by a black and white cat, and is smiling.

 

The details:
Pattern: Ottobre 2/2019 #15. Modern classics – high rise pants
Pattern details: “Fabulous, matte viscose-crepe pants. They have a high-rise waist, front-hip pockets and straight, wide legs. The contoured waistband is easy to adjust to fit your personal body shape.” Available in Ottobre Women Spring/Summer 2/2019, sizes 34-52.
Fabric: 2.1m x 114cm wide “Exclusive Parbury Fabrics screen print”
Other materials: Sheerweft interfacing to fuse fly facing (not shield), waistband and pocket openings (as instructed in pattern), Sullivans 25cm dress zip (cut short), 2 x 16mm buttons.
Mods: Size 42
– Made back waistband in 2 pieces (added CB seam) for fabric economy and fitting
– Removed 1.5cm height from rise
– Removed approx. 5cm length from hem (not including hem allowance)
– Added hem facing for fabric economy

Author: Siobhan S

20 something, living in country Australia. Spoonie profile: ME/CFS, dysautonomia, anxiety. All about sewing, knitting and food. Unapologetic feminist and disability advocate.

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