New Strokkur

It was only a few weeks ago that I shared my Strokkur jumper with you….and now I have another one! You might recall that although I loved the fit and design of the Strokkur jumper, the Lopi yarn I knitted it with was just too scratchy for my liking. So I sold that one, and promptly knitted another.

A woman stands in front of a garden fence. She wears a yellow and grey colourwork yoke Icelandic jumper, blue jeans and brown suede boots.

This time, I chose to knit with Knit Picks Wool of the Andes Superwash. If, like most Australian knitters, you’re used to superwash merino, this might still be a bit scratchy for you. But it softens up well in the wash, and I know from past projects I don’t have a terrible reaction to it. WotA comes in a wide range of colours and is far more affordable than Spotlight or Lincraft yarns.

A woman stands in front of a garden fence. She wears a yellow and grey colourwork yoke Icelandic jumper, blue jeans and brown suede boots.

The mods I made were much the same as in my previous project: knit from the top down, substitute garter border for rib neckband and hems, and work own body and sleeve shaping. I wish I’d paid a bit more attention to my notes, as I intended to work all short rows in between the ribbing and colourwork, but worked 4 there and 2 below the colourwork as in my previous project (the pattern calls for more below the colourwork).

A woman stands in front of a garden fence. She wears a yellow and grey colourwork yoke Icelandic jumper, blue jeans and brown suede boots.

In this area, short rows serve the function of elongating the back of the garment, thus bringing it forward on the neck. It’s more anatomically correct, and certainly more comfortable this way. We’re not symmetrical, after all! I don’t really see the point of placing short rows below the colourwork, as this acts more like a hump back adjustment and creates an unsightly bulge for anyone who does not have space to fill in that area.

Next time I’d definitely knit all 6 short rows (or more as needed) just below the ribbing, as is standard in most patterns. It’s not a huge deal, but the neck on the jumper creeps back a little without them. The colours also aren’t quite as contrasting as in my previous version, largely due to colour restrictions when choosing WotA. You can still see the pattern, but it’s not quite as defined as with the previous colourway.

A yellow and grey colourwork jumper is laid flat on a patterned carpet.

 

Otherwise, I’m quite happy with how this jumper turned out. It was a quick knit (for me at least) – less than 2 months from start to finish. And now I kinda want a whole wardrobe full of colourwork yokes!

A woman stands in front of a garden fence. She wears a yellow and grey colourwork yoke Icelandic jumper, blue jeans and brown suede boots.

The deets:
Pattern: Strokkur by Ysolda Teague (my Ravelry notes)
Pattern details: “Strokkur was inspired by traditional Icelandic Lopapeysas: cozy sweaters with colourful yoke patterns. Strokkur features a more refined fit than many traditional yoked sweaters. It is worked from the bottom up with gentle waist shaping. The yoke patterning is fairly short; to flatteringly frame the face and avoid bagginess around the underarm. Short rows are worked both above and below the stranded colourwork to create a scooped neckline.”
Yarn: Knit Picks Wool of the Andes Superwash. 750.4 meters (820.6 yards) Cobblestone Heather (MC), 56.3 meters (61.6 yards) Semolina (CC1), 60.4 meters (66.0 yards) Dove Heather (CC2).
Needles: 4.5mm for body, 4mm for rib
Mods: 38.25″ size with slightly different row gauge (18 sts & 26 rows / 4” blocked)
– Worked top down
– Substituted garter stitch bands for 2×2 rib, changed neckband cast on to fit
– Regular wrapped short rows instead of wrapless
– Only worked 2 short rows after colourwork instead of 6 (4 beforehand)
– Increased depth of yoke to 10”
– No body shaping, slower and more evenly spaced sleeve shaping (more details in Ravelry notes)

Author: Siobhan S

20 something, living in country Australia. Spoonie profile: ME/CFS, dysautonomia, anxiety. All about sewing, knitting and food. Unapologetic feminist and disability advocate.

10 thoughts on “New Strokkur”

  1. I love the design of this, it looks so cute and comfy too! Good to hear the material softens nicely after washing. I’m always so impressed by your knits. I wonder if my mother could have a go at this one, she had wanted to try knitting again (and I’d love a jumper like this, hehe) 🙂
    Caz x

    Liked by 1 person

  2. This jumper is absolutely stupendous! A whole wardrobe is certainly called for! We have nothing like this in New York City–even the word ‘jumper’ means something entirely different. Wow!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, I think you call them pullovers? Or sweaters? The terminology has seeped through here, but jumper does make for good terrible jokes…….”what do you call a cross between a sheep and a kangaroo? A woolly jumper!”

      Like

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