Simplicity 1873 Sun Jacket

One of the strategies I use to maintain my current level of activity is have my dad take me for a drive in the afternoon. It gets me out of the house at a time I’d really rather be sleeping, and ensures I stay accustomed to the (horrible!) motion of the car. The sun has been so hot this summer that I can feel it burning me through the windscreen (sunscreen or no), and I’ve been covering up with a multitude of scarves.

A woman stands against a garden fence. She wears a blue and white polka dot sun jacket, yellow shirt, and red floral print skirt.

This jacket was sewn to replace those scarves, and keep my arms protected from the scorching sun on my drives. The pattern is Cynthia Rowley for Simplicity 1873, which you have already seen on this blog in the form of my Marimekko-inspired dress. This is jacket variation D, a short-sleeved, oversized jacket with a drop shoulder.

I first cut my regular size 16 to 18 at the waist, with a lengthened sleeve, but had to cut it back down to a size 14 as it was just so huge. This is obviously meant to be an oversized style, but I felt engrossed in swathes of fabric which didn’t hang neatly on my body, rather than actually wearing a garment.

A woman stands against a garden fence. She wears a blue and white polka dot sun jacket, yellow shirt, and red floral print skirt. Her arms are raised and she has a quizzical expression.
But srsly tho WHAT AM I WEARING

The size 14 is a little better, but still unnecessarily large. The armholes in particular reach nearly all the way down to the waist, yet the sleeves are separate to the bodice – it seems like the designer was aiming for a half kimono/half dropped sleeve jacket, and picked the worst of both worlds.

A woman stands against a garden fence. She wears a blue and white polka dot sun jacket, yellow shirt, and red floral print skirt.

My intention was for a 30’s, Evil Under the Sun-inspired sun jacket, but unfortunately, I’ve come up with more an 80s puffer jacket. The Peter Ustinov, 1982 adaptation of Agatha Christie’s novel was half 30s gorgeousness, half anachronistic 80s atrocity, so perhaps my intention came back to bite me.

See caption.
Maggie Smith vs Jane Birkin in Evil Under the Sun (1982). Those costume designers have a lot to answer for.

This garment is a thumbs down for me – it’s too loose and unwieldily to be comfortable, even when just sitting in the car. Next time I’ll try a different pattern so I don’t look like an extra from The Breakfast Club.

A woman stands against a garden fence. She wears a blue and white polka dot sun jacket, yellow shirt, and red floral print skirt.
The rest of my outfit: viscose op shopped top, Sewaholic Crescent Skirt, ratty shoes reserved for walking to the letterbox. I didn’t intend to do photos, but if I’m upright, outside and there is someone nearby who can snap a pic, it’s a photoshoot.

 

The deets:
Pattern: Simplicity 1873, view D jacket
Pattern details: paper pattern. Fit and flare dress with pleated skirt, sleeve and neckline options, and separate jacket. Sizes 6-22.
Fabric: Single cotton sheet in blue with white polka dots, from op shop
Other materials: Sheerweft interfacing. Strips lightweight interfacing to stabilise underarm when clipped.
Mods:
– 12mm forward head adjustment, same to sleeve
– Lengthened sleeve to wrist, used interfaced sleeve hem instead of facing

Author: Siobhan S

20 something, living in country Australia. Spoonie profile: ME/CFS, dysautonomia, anxiety. All about sewing, knitting and food. Unapologetic feminist and disability advocate.

7 thoughts on “Simplicity 1873 Sun Jacket”

  1. I do like this actually! (Although can’t be doing the PH Poirot. David Suchet all the way for me!) But when you make something that is intended to be functional and it doesn’t function, it can be quite useful to cut your losses and make a second attempt.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Too right! And I’m a HUGE Suchet/Poirot fan, to the point where I’ve watched every episode he ever made. I’ve just tried Peter Ustinov recently and he’s not really a scratch on David, though the movies are kinda entertaining in their own right. We don’t talk about Albert Finney 😂😂

      Liked by 1 person

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